Here are five ways to help you take your team sales presentations to the next level:
Know your stuff. Okay, this is an obvious one. Having the experience, knowledge and insights about your role and how it helps the prospective client/client is a fundamental requirement. It’s a basic qualifier. But here’s the thing, successful sales professionals are able to talk about their role and how it addresses the buyer’s needs with… Confidence and ease. Appearing confident, and at ease in front of a high stakes prospect or client whose job it is to judge you takes practice and effort. I’ve heard that for some people getting to the optimum level of confidence and ease is helped by practicing and getting coaching and encouragement from colleagues. For others, it’s practicing on their own in front of a mirror until they get it “right.” And there’s nothing like experience – building your confidence and comfort in front of an audience by getting out there and doing it, again and again. For most of us, it is about appearing confident as we manage the butterflies in our stomach, or, as someone said to me “Get them to fly in formation.” When we can do this our confidence and ease allows us to…
Engage in a conversation. This is the opposite of a formal presentation where we say what we think needs to be said in a way that sounds scripted, or, literally, reading from a script. Everything about what we say and how we behave should send the signal that we are interested in a two-way exchange of thoughts, ideas and reactions. See the above point about ways to encourage conversations to happen. And it is also about seeking reactions by asking specific questions, or requesting feedback. Sometimes when we do make enquiries the response we get from the prospect can result in the conversation going in an unanticipated direction so there is, sometimes, a need to be…
Flexible. This is about the willingness and ability to pivot from wherever the conversation is to wherever the prospect or client would like to take it. It’s about trusting yourself and/or your teammates to be able to handle whatever the people on the other side of the table surface as being important to them. This trust in yourself and in each other comes from creating psychological safety (see previous blogs for more on this), so that when you are in the presentation you are…
Feeling connected to each other, engaged in a common goal (win the deal!) and being willing to support one and other, and hold each other accountable are the ingredients of a high performing team. So, making time to get to know your fellow team members by spending time together practicing and helping the individuals and collective get better, eating meals together or just hanging out can all help foster the dynamic, whether spoken or unspoken, that says “I’ve got your back.”